Star Wars Toys & Collectibles Review: Hasbro Star Wars The Black Series – Aurra Sing 6-inch Scale Action Figure

Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

AURRA SING: A feared bounty hunter known for her chalk-white skin and built-in comlink antenna, Aurra Sing was an expert sniper and trained assassin who would work for anyone who paid her.  – Hasbro packaging blurb, Star Wars The Black Series: Aurra Sing 

Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

On October 1, 2021, Hasbro released Star Wars The Black Series: Aurra Sing, a 6-inch (15 ¼ cm) scale action figure of the fearsome Palliduvan bounty hunter from the Star Wars prequel era. A former member of the Jedi Order who left the monastic order of Force-sensitives for a life with the galaxy’s underworld, Sing is known for her skills with a long-barreled sniper rifle, her prowess with hand-held blaster pistols, and her built-in antenna.

Aurra Sing is not only physically intimidating, but she is well-armed with a sniper rifle and two blaster pistols. Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

Star Wars The Black Series: Aurra Sing is the eighth figure in the revamped collection of 6-inch (15 ¼ cm) action figures, which feature new packaging that not only looks different from the original red-black boxes for Hasbro’s eight-year-old Star Wars The Black Series line but also identifies the Lucasfilm movie or TV show the character is from.

STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS: Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the Star Wars Galaxy with this premium Aurra Sing toy, inspired by the Star Wars: The Clone Wars series. – Hasbro product promotional blurb[1]

What’s in the Box?

Star Wars The Black Series figures come in displayable packaging. Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

Aurra Sing, like the other figures in the new iteration of Hasbro’s Star Wars The Black Series 6-inch (15 ¼ cm) collection, comes in a box with a “window” on the front which allows you to see the figure and its accessories without opening the package.

Aurra Sing, of course, stands in the center of the box, where we can see her clad in an orange jumpsuit and a brown-gray vest. The jumpsuit is sleeveless; thus we see Sing’s bare, milk-white arms, which are a trait of her humanoid species, the Palliduvians, which are native to Nar Shadaa, a.k.a. the Smugglers’ Moon that orbits Nal Hutta, home world to the slug-like Hutts.

Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

ENTERTAINMENT-BASED CHARACTER-INSPIRED ACCESSORIES: This Star Wars The Black Series action figure comes with 3 detachable entertainment-inspired accessories, including 2 blasters and a blaster rifle. – Hasbro promotional blurb

Hasbro also packed Aurra Sing’s arsenal into separate compartments around the transparent front panel, so the bounty hunter’s two BlasTech laser pistols and her long-barreled sniper rifle are viewable as well.

Aurra Sing comes with the following accessories

  • Two BlasTech blaster pistols (they can be tucked into Sing’s hip holsters when not in use
  • One sniper-style long-barreled blaster rifle with a sling

My Take

Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

Aurra Sing was introduced in a brief cameo during the Podrace sequence in George Lucas’s 1999 Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. She was created by Lucasfilm’s chief designer Doug Chiang (who dubbed her “Babe Fett”). Played by actor/model Michonne Bourriague, Sing is seen as an onlooker watching the fateful Podrace in which a young slave boy named Anakin Skywalker (Jake Lloyd) wins his freedom when he defeats the dastardly Dug racing champion Sebulba.

Although Aurra didn’t have a huge role in The Phantom Menace, she inspired several Hasbro Star Wars action figures, including a 2001 Star Wars: Power of the Jedi 3 ¾-inch scale figure and a pricey ($75.00!) 12-inch scale Dawn of the Bounty Hunters collector’s edition figure from 1999.

STAR WARS: THE CLONE WARS: Fans and collectors can imagine scenes from the Star Wars Galaxy with this premium Aurra Sing toy, inspired by the Star Wars: The Clone Wars series. – Hasbro promotional blurb

Eventually, “Babe Fett” got her due and a sizeable role in the 3D animated series Star Wars: The Clone Wars, where she was featured in four episodes (Lightsaber Lost, Death Trap, R2 Come Home, and Lethal Trackdown). There, she was rendered as an animated (but still scary!) version of a lethal galactic badass who is a killer for hire. She was voiced by Jaime King in Star Wars: The Clone Wars.

Because Aurra Sing is seen more like an animated character than as a live-action one, her origin is indicated as being Star Wars: The Clone Wars on the packaging.

The Star Wars The Black Series: Aurra Sing  6-inch (15 ¾-cm) action figure is a new addition and not a reissue of an earlier release. It is a cool rendition of the deadly bounty hunter that stalked targets of underworld figures (including Jabba and Ziro the Hutts) during the fall of the Republic and rise of the Empire eras.[2]

As is the case with Hasbro’s Star Wars The Black Series action figures based on human or near-human characters, Aurra Sing benefits greatly from modern toymaking tools and techniques. Her sculpt looks incredibly lifelike, down to Sing’s green eyes, a mostly shaved head which is topped by a fiery-brown ponytail, and an unnerving implanted comlink antenna on the left of her head (slightly off-center).

The figure even bears Aurra Sing’s trademark black eye makeup, which is a nod to Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982). In that film, which starred Star Wars actor Harrison Ford as Rick Deckard, Darryl Hannah’s character, the replicant Pris, wears a similar strip of black eye makeup, which contrasts weirdly with her pale complexion.

PREMIUM DESIGN AND ARTICULATION: Star Wars fans can display this fully articulated figure featuring poseable head, arms, and legs, as well as premium deco, in their action figure and vehicle collection. – Hasbro promotional blurb

Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

The Star Wars The Black Series – Aurra Sing figure is fully poseable; it has more points of articulation – or POAs –  (12) than Kenner’s original Star Wars figures (except, of course, for Kenner’s 12-inch action figures, which had more POAs than the more numerous 3.75-inch figures, which only had, at most, five points of articulation).  

This is another reason why many adult collectors – such as this reviewer – like Star Wars The Black Series action figures, especially the larger six-inch scale ones. POAs are analogous to the human body’s ball-and-socket and swivel joints and allow fans – young and old – to pose their figures in more life-like stances than you could ever do with their Kenner counterparts from the early days of the Star Wars saga. (You can see this in the Hasbro promo photos in this review.)

All in all, this 2021 Star Wars The Black Series: Aurra Sing is anaction figure that will make a fine addition to any Star Wars fan’s collection.

Well, this brings us to the end of my review of a new-to-me Star Wars The Black Series collectible. I had fun writing it, and I hope you will find it both enjoyable and informative.

Image Credit: Hasbro. (C) 2021 Hasbro, Inc. and Lucasfilm Ltd.

Until next time, Dear Reader, stay safe, stay healthy, and find joy in even the small things in life. And remember, the Force will be with you…always. 


[1] Although Aurra Sing was introduced in a brief blink-and-you-miss-it cameo in 1999’s Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (Michonne Bourriague), she has a more prominent role in the animated Star Wars: The Clone Wars series (2008-2014), where she is voiced by actor Jaime King).

[2] In canon, we learn in Solo: A Star Wars Story that Tobias Beckett ended Sing’s career and life in an encounter sometime before Han Solo’s first Kessel Run flight aboard the Millennium Falcon 10 years before the Battle of Yavin.

Published by Alex Diaz-Granados

Alex Diaz-Granados (1963- ) began writing movie reviews as a staff writer and Entertainment Editor for his high school newspaper in the early 1980s and was the Diversions editor for Miami-Dade Community College, South Campus' student newspaper for one semester. Using his experiences in those publications, Alex has been raving and ranting about the movies online since 2003 at various web sites, including Amazon, Ciao and Epinions. In addition to writing reviews, Alex has written or co-written three films ("A Simple Ad," "Clown 345," and "Ronnie and the Pursuit of the Elusive Bliss") for actor-director Juan Carlos Hernandez. You can find his reviews and essays on his blogs, A Certain Point of View and A Certain Point of View, Too.

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